Tag Archives: Independent Thinking

Read Any Good Books Lately, Chapter 2

In a previous post (See: Read Any Good Books Lately?) I told about a young man, George, a high schooler who shared with me a love of good literature. His favorite book is The Giver, by Lois Lowry, a story about independent thinking , a value we naturally cherish, but which is frowned upon by the Watchtower society. Since reading The Giver, I have been champing at the bit to talk with George about it. I got my opportunity during this last kingdom hall visit. Kind of.

George was with his dad, Darryl, when we talked. And mostly Darryl talked. But I didn’t mind; actually it worked out quite well. I told both of them about my book that I recently completed and published on Amazon, and Darryl questioned me about it a lot. I could tell he was grilling me (politely) to see whether or not it would be something that he would approve of his son reading. I had the pleasure of describing my purpose in writing, to draw atheists and agnostics toward the reasonableness and desirability of theism. And I delighted to tell him about my commitment to a faithfulness to scriptural truth. Darryl seemed satisfied with my answers. I’m pleased to have been able to recommend my book to George with dad’s approval, rather than George having to possibly sneak to read it.

The whole time that I was talking with Darryl, George was listening intently. I was finally able to ask George again what he liked about The Giver. His response was very different from when I had talked with him apart from his dad. This time, there was not any mention of independent thinking, but only an expression of appreciation for Lois Lowry’s creativity and compelling style. I don’t think I’m imagining that George had confided in me something that he didn’t want to express in the presence of his dad.

Oh, Lord Jesus, I know you love George even more than I do. Please set him free into a new, vibrant life in Jesus.

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Read Any Good Books Lately?

The_Giver_first_edition_1993

The last time I attended the meeting at the local kingdom hall (I think it was in March), I was chatting with one of the young men there, a high school student whom I will call George. I really like George. He reminds me of me when I was a highschooler. We’re both brainy, introverted, tall, klutzy; you know where I’m going with this–we’re nerds, ok? Anyway, we both like to read, and he was quite interested to hear me describe the book that I have written and will soon publish, a “dystopian” work of fiction. (If you don’t know what that is, think Hunger Games or any of the recent popular stories set in “ideal” but dysfunctional societies.)

So after hearing my description of my book, George said, “That reminds me of one of my favorite books.” When I asked him what that was, he said The Giver, by Lois Lowry. Being unfamiliar with that book or author, I asked him to describe it for me and tell me why he liked it. He said that it was about independence and thinking for oneself.

“Uh–”

Me, speechless.

George’s favorite work of literature has as its main theme a value that is explicitly denounced by the Watchtower Society. The literal phrase “independent thinking” is used as a negative buzzword in the literature and the kingdom hall talks. So when George said that, you could have knocked me over with a feather.

I immediately decided that I needed to read that book. Not many days later I downloaded it from Amazon and read it. I was shocked and delighted that George valued the story of a boy who ends up questioning everything that has ever been taught him by the overbearing organization under which he and his family live. The parallels in the story to someone living as a Jehovah’s Witness are obvious. But the question haunts me: are the parallels obvious to George?

Is George’s valuing of this story an indication of his own questioning of the Watchtower? Or does he merely think it a cool story, making no connection between the life of the main character and his own? I’m drowning in curiosity, and can’t wait to talk with George about it some more.

Whether George is already doubting and questioning the WT, or whether interest in this story can begin to spark that “independent thinking,” the evidence indicates that God is at work in either case. What an amazing opportunity I have before me to talk with a young man about the freedom he can have in Jesus. Please pray for George.

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